Sinbad the Sailor aka Tinbad the Tailor

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Where: Unknown

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When: 01 December 1892

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Cover of a programme for Sinbad the Sailor, the pantomime in Dublin's Gaiety Theatre at Christmas 1892.

James Joyce mentions this in the Ithaca Episode of Ulysses and may well have seen it with his family - he would have been aged 10 at the time...

Date: December 1892

NLI Ref.: LO 8041

Info:

Owner: National Library of Ireland on The Commons
Source: Flickr Commons
Views: 60884
gaietytheatre southkingstreet dublin ireland leinster michaelgunn sinbadthesailor pantomime greenleafwithers programme december christmas 1890s 1892 1893 january 19thcentury jamesjoyce ulysses ithaca ithacaepisode theatre ephemera ephemeracollection ghostsofxmaspast nationallibraryofireland williecrackles greenleafwithersbrown sindbadthesailor tindbadthetailor christmasacrossthecommons

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    John Spooner

    • 13/Dec/2013 10:00:53

    The adverts & reviews for this production (in Freeman's Journal) spell it "Sindbad". The part of Sindbad Tinbad was played by Mr. Willie Crackles.

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 13/Dec/2013 10:16:52

    [http://www.flickr.com/photos/johnspooner] Willie Crackles and Greenleaf Withers! You couldn't make this stuff up...

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    John Spooner

    • 13/Dec/2013 11:57:35

    In the Freeman's review on 27 December, the sets and the costumes come in for particular praise. In addition

    Mr J W Volt, as Mrs Sindbad, was mainly instrumental in making the fun of the piece go fast and furious, and Mr. Crackles, whose particular name will enter into the minds and memories of the youth of the city, made the part of Tinbad quite remarkable.
    Also
    The dances are good, and Miss Jessie Noire's Serpentine dance was a feature of the time.
    That last bit has made me feel all peculiar.

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 13/Dec/2013 12:00:28

    [http://www.flickr.com/photos/johnspooner] Have a sit down and a cuppa, John, and you'll be right as rain! The chorus dancers must have been raging about "the dances are good" - talk about damning with faint praise.

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    John Spooner

    • 13/Dec/2013 12:04:47

    1895 serpentine dance on youtube

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 13/Dec/2013 12:08:53

    [http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]] From the Irish Times of Friday, 1 June 1906:

    LORD BALLYBANTAM Some twenty years ago an exceedingly clever political squib appeared under the title of "Ballymuckbeg", and bearing the signature of "Greenleaf Withers". For some reason this gentleman in the interval has added "Brown" to his name, while it is an open secret that he is not other than the author of "Dublin Doggerels"...

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 13/Dec/2013 12:14:39

    [http://www.flickr.com/photos/johnspooner] Oooh-er! Don't know about Serpentine, but that made me a little seasick.

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    John Spooner

    • 13/Dec/2013 13:13:19

    The Belfast News-letter, in its 'Dublin Day by Day column':

    Mr Crackle exerts himself to the utmost, but his "Get your har cut" is a little too stale ... Miss Violet Evelyn is a showy Sinbad. The ballets are splendid, and Miss Jessie Noir as premier danseuse wins hearty plaudits for her serpentine dance.
    The serpentine dance seems hit Britain in 1892. No mention of it before July 1892, but suddenly it was all the rage. It seems to have been imported from America - in August the Alhambra brought Miss Jenny Joyce from America to perform it, but the Empire beat them by a week with Miss Estrella Sylvia . That didn't stop Lizze Don (of the Don sisters - the others were Lulu and Emma - who had spent 2 years in America) writing to The Era claiming to have been first. An advert in The Era in July backs this up this claim. Yet another dancer, Miss Loie Fuller, tried to copyright it, and some observers said Donato, the one-legged dancer, had performed something similar years earlier at Covent Garden. That winter it featured in just about every panto in Britain, "the inevitable serpentine dancer", as one reviewer put it. It was still being performed in 1900, but with gimmicks. In Plymouth "Miss Nellie does a serpentine dance on a rolling sphere", in Newport, "Serpentine Dance by a Lady amongst the Lions", in Merthyr Tydfil "Miss Emmelines in a serpentine dance on a rolling globe", and at the Metropole "a specially serpentine dance with wonderful kaleidescopic effect".

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    TEXASJOHN

    • 13/Dec/2013 14:37:39

    Love the artwork on the program!

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    zippo22

    • 13/Dec/2013 15:14:31

    www.youtube.com/watch?v=BZcbntA4bVY

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 29/Mar/2016 21:17:35

    I have just added this photo to our 50,000+ Views Album. [https://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland/sets/72157651136879037]