A fine body of men...

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Where: 12-20 Blake's Ln, Waterford, Ireland

Try to find the spot where the photographer was standing.

When: 19 September 1906

Try to find the date or year when this image was made.
... and their equipment. These are signal men of the Royal Irish Artillery under Major Heath in Waterford. The major may be in the photo.

Photographer: Poole Photographic Studios, Waterford

Date: Wednesday, 19 September 1906

NLI Ref: POOLEWP 1614a

You can also view this image, and many thousands of others, on the NLI’s catalogue at catalogue.nli.ie

Info:

Owner: National Library of Ireland on The Commons
Source: Flickr Commons
Views: 47831
majorheath royalirishartillery artillery soldiers uniforms waterford ireland munster barracks ahpoole arthurhenripoole glassnegative wednesday 19th september 1906 20thcentury nationallibraryofireland artillerybarracks cannonstreet blakeslane gunner lancebombardier captain sergeant begbielamp paraffinlamp signalsdetail lanyards semaphore flags heliographs poolephotographiccollection

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  • profile

    derangedlemur

    • 08/Nov/2013 08:57:57

    Presumably here: maps.osi.ie/publicviewer/#V1,660117,611797,7,9

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    derangedlemur

    • 08/Nov/2013 09:06:04

    I don't see any Majors.

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 08/Nov/2013 09:08:39

    [http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]] That's the one, thanks. ofarrl told us a while back that it no longer exists.

  • profile

    Robinson_Luzo

    • 08/Nov/2013 09:08:40

    Could the Major be the chap in the middle with the mustache? As I recall officers and NCOs had to have facial hair until the 1930s in the army, one man was court marshaled for shaving his off during WW1!

  • profile

    Robinson_Luzo

    • 08/Nov/2013 09:09:38

    Ok, Captain, but not Major. Still a person of importance

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 08/Nov/2013 09:09:50

    [http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]] Damn! Thought the moustachioed chap might be Major Heath, but you say he's a Captain.

  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 08/Nov/2013 09:16:08

    1906? Just missed JPG Worlledge, who got his commission in July 1907.... Soldiers Going Away II

  • profile

    derangedlemur

    • 08/Nov/2013 09:20:47

    [http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]] I think you may be misremembering something. There's no end of photos of clean-shaven officers from WWI.

  • profile

    derangedlemur

    • 08/Nov/2013 09:22:39

    Soldiers are listed in the census but there's no Heath in the whole of Waterford, let alone Barrack St. Many of them even say Royal Artillery (or some variation) and rank instead of just Soldier.

  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 08/Nov/2013 09:23:01

    ...and now, with spooky baby!

  • profile

    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 08/Nov/2013 09:23:10

    [http://www.flickr.com/photos/gnmcauley] Ah, J.P.G! I love that photo.

  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 08/Nov/2013 09:24:54

    In 1911 there'a a Dora Heath, 19, Birthplace London, Nursemaid, Church of England.

  • profile

    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 08/Nov/2013 09:25:11

    [http://www.flickr.com/photos/gnmcauley] I know! That's the one I was going to use, and there's a little kid sticking his head between two of the back row soldiers in that one too. But everything else was much clearer in this one...

  • profile

    Robinson_Luzo

    • 08/Nov/2013 09:25:28

    [http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]] 1914-1918.invisionzone.com/forums/index.php?showtopic=83216

  • profile

    derangedlemur

    • 08/Nov/2013 09:34:04

    Of course 1906 is a bad year to find soldiers in the census. They come and go and most of them are English anyway.

  • profile

    derangedlemur

    • 08/Nov/2013 09:35:48

    [http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]] That's not exactly reputable evidence. I'd go with the photos.

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    Robinson_Luzo

    • 08/Nov/2013 09:40:22

    [http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]] Fair enough

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    billh35

    • 08/Nov/2013 09:55:46

    Any photos of the 2nd Royal Irish Rifles at NLI?

  • profile

    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 08/Nov/2013 10:35:11

    [http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]] Slim pickings by name, e.g. Second Battalion Royal Irish Rifles, Regimental Football Club, Winners of the Army Cup (sadly not digitised). Have a rummage in our catalogue though, as they may not be so perfectly named...

  • profile

    swordscookie back and trying to catch up!

    • 08/Nov/2013 11:07:17

    I know that there are problems with Flickr but this conversation is the most disjointed I have ever seen, reminiscent of the Monty Python sketch where he answers every second question:-(((

  • profile

    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 08/Nov/2013 11:16:22

    [http://www.flickr.com/photos/swordscookie] :( Hi Sean. The view I always have on the go is Recent Activity, so I see all the comments in order...

  • profile

    swordscookie back and trying to catch up!

    • 08/Nov/2013 12:27:36

    It is an interesting shot of the signals detail. The white lanyards are an artillery thing, they were used to trigger the action on the guns. This was taken before the invention of the radio and the methods of signalling on view are "Semaphore" (the flags),, lights for morse code and heliographs using the reflections of the sun! The captain doesn't look like he's in a good mood, does he?

  • profile

    billh35

    • 08/Nov/2013 13:32:21

    [http://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland] Just had a fascinating prowl around the catalogue!

  • profile

    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 08/Nov/2013 14:21:44

    [http://www.flickr.com/photos/swordscookie] Thanks! Nice crop of tags. And no, the captain doesn't look very happy. Mind you, the others don't either. Maybe they were putting on their serious, having our photographs taken, faces...

  • profile

    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 08/Nov/2013 14:22:06

    [http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]] So that's what all the banging and clanking was about! :)

  • profile

    TEXASJOHN

    • 08/Nov/2013 14:22:14

    Great photograph!

  • profile

    ofarrl

    • 08/Nov/2013 14:49:12

    I could be completely wrong but this looks more like the Infantry Barracks, possibly by the wall along Green Street. Great photo by the way.

  • profile

    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 08/Nov/2013 14:57:51

    [http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]] The Curse of the Waterford Barracks lives on! Paul, I was so proud of remembering your comment about the Artillery Barracks being at the corner of Cannon Street and Blakes Lane.

  • profile

    ofarrl

    • 08/Nov/2013 15:04:38

    I was very impressed Carol. Will have to take a closer look when I get home, just started work out here on the left coast unfortunately.

  • profile

    derangedlemur

    • 08/Nov/2013 15:05:07

    If it's the infantry barracks, it more or less matches the map looking south here beside the entrance: maps.osi.ie/publicviewer/#V1,660223,612073,7,9

  • profile

    derangedlemur

    • 08/Nov/2013 15:17:14

    Are the trees behind the wall a sign that it's near the grave yard in the artillery barracks? Trees are generally marked on the 25" and there's none around the infantry barracks.

  • profile

    swordscookie back and trying to catch up!

    • 08/Nov/2013 15:18:34

    Looking again at the flags there are two kinds of semaphore flags on display! The short flags that are stacked are for the form where different positions were used for different letters. The sender always stood with his back to the receiver to avoid any confusion about right and left! The other long flags being held by the men seated on the ground and those at either end of the back row were used for morse code where a long overhead sweep was a dash and a shorter sweep to one side was a dot. So SOS was three short sweeps followed by three long sweeps followed by three short sweeps! The telescopes of course were to enable the receiver perhaps a mile or more away to be able to see and distinguish the signals from afar!

  • profile

    ofarrl

    • 08/Nov/2013 15:41:07

    [http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/] The graveyard is not in the Artillery Barracks but in the grounds of the convent next door. The OSI map is misleading, the barracks is at the corner of Blakes Lane and Cannon street. The graveyard shown is at the bottom of a steep hill and the trees there would not have been visible from the barracks. View from the top of Blakes Lane, wall on left is a remnant of the Artillery barracks maps.google.com/maps?q=blakes+lane,+waterford,+ireland&am...

  • profile

    oaktree_brian_1976

    • 09/Nov/2013 01:21:41

    That's the British "Stiff upper lip" in action.

  • profile

    oaktree_brian_1976

    • 09/Nov/2013 01:30:21

    John Burgoyne served with their Regiment in the American Revolutionary War, 200 some years before these fellows.

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    John Spooner

    • 17/Nov/2013 17:20:19

    [http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]] British Army facial hair From comments made when I strayed elsewhere My Tommy's War The London Times, Saturday, Oct 07, 1916

    THE ARMY MOUSTACHE OPTIONAL UNDER A NEW ORDER An Army Order issued last night directs that in paragraph 1,696 of the King's regulations the words "but not the upper lip" shall be deleted. The paragraph originally read:- "The hair of the head will be kept short. The chin and under lip will be shaved, but not the upper lip. Whiskers, if worn, will be of moderate length."
    I suspect that those who appear clean-shaven have what the Times describes later in the article as the "newly joined ploughboy's youthful wisp of straw-coloured hair", or perhaps the photo was taken shortly after the amendment to King's Regulations, and few had taken advantage of their new freedom to choose. Looking at some of the examples of face-furniture I can't help agreeing with the Times that
    its compulsory growth by clean-shaven civilians on joining the Army must have often gone against the grain. More than one pattern has evolved of late; and the now permissible clean sweep of the razor over the upper lip every morning will probably occupy less time than some of the niggling operations which the latest developments render necessary.
    On Dec 28th 1916 the London Times published an article entitled "Christmas at the front. A day's experience", which must have been experienced at Christmas 1915. A snippet:
    A very junior subaltern had undergone Court-martial for shaving his upper lip - it would be exaggeration to say his moustache - contrary to then existing King's Regulations

  • profile

    Robinson_Luzo

    • 17/Nov/2013 19:14:13

    [http://www.flickr.com/photos/johnspooner] Thank you!, though I don't know if that was the specific case I was mentioning earlier...

  • profile

    drumaneen

    • 11/Dec/2013 01:34:49

    The officer in this photo is the rank of Captain.

  • profile

    signal mirror

    • 24/Dec/2016 01:11:15

    The link to the library seems broken - here is a link that works: catalogue.nli.ie/Record/vtls000591852