Two men and a young boy (Tom Wild) on a motorbike, with a teddy bear sitting on the handle bars

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Where: Unknown

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When: 01 January 1910

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Tom Wild was the nephew of Australian swimming star Beatrice Kerr.

This image is part of an archive series consisting of photographs relating to the career of champion Australian swimmer, diver and vaudeville entertainer in Australia and the United Kingdom Beatrice Kerr. If reproduced or distributed, this image should be clearly attributed to the collection of the Australian National Maritime Museum; and not be used for any commercial or for-profit purposes without the permission of the museum. For more information see our Flickr Commons Rights Statement.

The ANMM undertakes research and accepts public comments that enhance the information we hold about images in our collection. This record has been updated accordingly.

Thank you for helping caption this important historical image.

Object number ANMS1031[069]

ANMM Collection Gift from Michael Williams

Info:

Owner: Australian National Maritime Museum on The Commons
Source: Flickr Commons
Views: 28329
bike cycle beatricekerr teddybear child boy norton motorbike motorcycle tomwild morton motorrad vintage jungen jugend youth

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  • profile

    quasymody

    • 29/Oct/2013 00:47:32

    Ha! what a priceless pic! That bear is being led astray... [http://www.flickr.com/photos/anmm_thecommons/10322309574/] same bear, same little boy [http://www.flickr.com/photos/anmm_thecommons/10322247073/in/photostream/] different motorcycle [http://www.flickr.com/photos/anmm_thecommons] psst!...this is a motorcycle! ...driven by a belt drive...the pedals were there primarily to start the motor...I gather if the motor died you could then resort to pedalling...... Where's a Norton tragic when you need one? They will be able to tell us its DOB...DNA...etc. My guess is it's of a similar vintage to the other (hiterto) unidentified motorcycle...ca. ???1912-1915.

  • profile

    Australian National Maritime Museum on The Commons

    • 29/Oct/2013 02:35:31

    [http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]] Oversight! Title fixed :) That bear was clearly very dear to someone :) In addition to a Norton expert, also required - Ford expert: Photograph of an unidentified woman driving a car

  • profile

    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 29/Oct/2013 05:41:32

    Wonderful photo!

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    pellethepoet

    • 29/Oct/2013 14:51:28

    Getting ready for the Great Teddy Bear Run? ... On second thoughts, I don't think he'll want to be donating that particular teddy!

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    klaasgroenewold

    • 30/Oct/2013 05:50:13

    Beautiful!

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 30/Oct/2013 10:35:17

    " The first Norton logo was a fairly simple, art nouveau design, with the name spelled in capitals.[as here] However, a new logo appeared on the front of the catalogue for 1914, which was a joint effort by James Lansdowne Norton and his daughter Ethel. It became known as the "curly N" logo, with only the initial letter as a capital, and was used by the company thereafter, first appearing on actual motorcycles in 1915. " From en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Norton_Motorcycle_Company Implying the Norton is pre-1915 ?

  • profile

    miniopterus

    • 30/Oct/2013 11:08:27

    Carbide headlamp. Teddy is sitting over the generator.

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    quasymody

    • 31/Oct/2013 00:05:23

    [http://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia] good find! ....

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    Australian National Maritime Museum on The Commons

    • 31/Oct/2013 04:51:02

    [http://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia] Ah good call! And thus we have a date range! PS Percival Kerr received a traffic fine a few years later. Perhaps in the car seen a few shots along?!

  • profile

    tedrobbo

    • 01/Nov/2013 15:54:45

    thevintagent.blogspot.co.uk/2008/11/praise-for-humble-16h... More important let us find out about the bear. No button in the ear. Jointed limbs, long arms. Does it have a hump?

  • profile

    quasymody

    • 02/Nov/2013 02:06:56

    [http://www.flickr.com/photos/sidpickle] Ha! I've put the bear in the too hard basket...but [http://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia] is probably on the trail!

  • profile

    tedrobbo

    • 02/Nov/2013 09:52:31

    Agree but worth a token effort. Information from a Teddy Bear web site; the description of head and ears seem to indicate American origins:--American Teddy Bear's have always had some unique characteristics which are great indicators in helping collectors identify early American bears. These characteristics are: •Broad, flattish triangular heads •Shorter muzzles than traditional German bears •Round ears set lower on the head •Slim long bodies •Shorter Straighter arms and legs •Round or Oval feet - See more at: www.totallyteddybears.com/american-teddy-bear.html#sthash...

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 02/Nov/2013 12:49:23

    [http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]] [http://www.flickr.com/photos/sidpickle] Ha! I went down in the woods today in disguise (to the total disapproval of my own teddy bear), and, sure of a big surprise, also came up with the American bears from the site above Ted (!) mentions. So possibly made by the Ideal Novelty and Toy Co - New York NY (1902 - 1984) - en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ideal_Toy_Company . Teddy Bear history is complicated - " By 1906 manufacturers other than Michtom and Steiff had joined in and the craze for "Roosevelt Bears" was such that ladies carried them everywhere, children were photographed with them, and Roosevelt used one as a mascot in his bid for re-election. " from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Teddy_bear

  • profile

    tedrobbo

    • 02/Nov/2013 15:44:34

    This could be his/her cousin. Expression is different but that could be due to sitting on a headlamp. www.smithsonianlegacies.si.edu/objectdescription.cfm?ID=72

  • profile

    pellethepoet

    • 02/Nov/2013 16:10:39

    When they (including teddy) were young? :) [http://www.flickr.com/photos/pellethepoet/5519436669/]

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    quasymody

    • 03/Nov/2013 02:10:50

    [http://www.flickr.com/photos/pellethepoet] ! [http://www.flickr.com/photos/sidpickle] bears everywhere! This one is v. similar to your Teddy Roosevelt [http://www.flickr.com/photos/anmm_thecommons/10394765015/in/photostream/]

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    quasymody

    • 03/Nov/2013 10:31:08

    Here's the template for the US models [http://www.flickr.com/photos/library_of_congress/10609185784/]

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    Australian National Maritime Museum on The Commons

    • 05/Nov/2013 03:54:35

    [http://www.flickr.com/photos/miniop] [http://www.flickr.com/photos/pellethepoet] [http://www.flickr.com/photos/sidpickle] [http://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia] Well this was a fruitful image to share! Who knew we had teddy bear experts in our midst! Love the discussion folks :)

  • profile

    tedrobbo

    • 05/Nov/2013 15:19:30

    Anyway, back to the bike. The first Nortons as I believe someone said had Peugeot engines and they were V twin. See www.motorcycle-usa.com/289/1535/Motorcycle-Article/1907-N... showing the first Isle of Man TT winner and you can spot the difference with that engine and our photograph. The most famous TT winning Nortons were the Manx. They were the first 500cc single to AVERAGE over 100MPH around the island. Norton returned to the island in 2013 with a bike with another foreign engine. Did OK but could not compete with the top factories. The noise it made had everyone talking. www.youtube.com/watch?v=r6O5QAsvlZw

  • profile

    tedrobbo

    • 05/Nov/2013 15:33:58

    Trip round the Isle of Man on youtube if you fancy it (skip the ad) www.youtube.com/watch?v=QVXc29ZgutI Not on a Norton I'm afraid.

  • profile

    Australian National Maritime Museum on The Commons

    • 05/Nov/2013 23:00:21

    [http://www.flickr.com/photos/sidpickle] Thanks Ted :P

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    juantoo34

    • 05/Oct/2014 01:55:11

    When is a Norton not a Norton?? Checking against other images of Nortons pre-WWI, there are numerous differences visible. Firstly the lettering on the tank is not of the usual style used before the 'Curly N' Norton logo was introduced in 1914/15 [https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/15439302701/] Secondly Norton tanks of the period were generally silver with some pin-striping. Clearly this tank is not standard Norton, if Norton at all. Next obvious thing is the V-shape of the frame behind the steering head, along with the accommodating shape of the tank. Again not standard Norton. The only cycle that has this feature is an Arno. Now looking at this photo, one can see that the motor has a very similar configuration to the 'Teddy Bear' bike. The Norton Model 3 490cc 3 1/2hp motor of the period has a magneto up front which the above Arno does not have. Instead it is behind the cylinder, just like on the 'Teddy Bear' photo, though it is almost entirely hidden by the gentleman's leg & Tom's heel. Next one can see on the Arno a smaller pipe at a forward angle from where the exhaust pipe appears to join the muffler in front of the engine. This is also visible on the 'Teddy Bear' bike. Almost certainly this is an Arno engine and not a Norton. Looking at the registration plate #8916, white numbers on a black background, would indicate that this bike was not registered in NSW which at that period had black numbers on a white background. Furthermore after 1912, 'NSW' would have also appeared on the plate. So therefore more likely Victoria. We are told the young boy is the nephew of Australian swimming star Beatrice Kerr whose brothers appear on an outfit in Albert Park, Melbourne. [https://www.flickr.com/photos/anmm_thecommons/10322247073/in/photostream/] The brother at the rear is Percival Kerr who appears as pillion passenger on the Teddy Bear bike. The gentleman at the helm of 'Teddy Bear' may be the chap in the chair with the dog in the other photo? Whatever, this puts the Teddy Bear bike most probably in the same area as Albert Park. The crunch now comes as the "*ORTON" (first letter obscured by a knee) mystery is finally solved. The www.vintagenorton.com was contacted re this 'Norton' and this was their reply: [www.vintagenorton.com/2014/08/when-is-norton-not-norton.html] So, it is a MORTON!!!!!!! My suspicions have been confirmed that it was no Norton. Thanks to all those who have helped solve this little mystery.

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 05/Oct/2014 06:28:29

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]] I'm mortonified it's not a Norton. Brilliant stuff!

  • profile

    pellethepoet

    • 05/Oct/2014 08:01:05

    [http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]] Fantastic work there. But I must say I'm a little annoyed that www.vintagenorton.com haven't bothered to acknowledge the Australian National Maritime Museum as the image source. It's a simple courtesy.

  • profile

    quasymody

    • 05/Oct/2014 09:36:33

    [http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]] That is absolutely brilliant! How amazing! But don't go anywhere! Got any ideas re the makes/dates of these? [https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/2633068434/in/photolist-51FavC-4LeRSo-5aAnEK-8thvvV-8tkwku] PS - my apologies for starting everyone on a goose chase down the Norton road this time last year! 100 years ago, I suspect that everyone and their dog living this side of Lonsdale St would have known in an instant that the bike was a Morton. nla.gov.au/nla.news-article74231527 1914 obit for Mr J. Moreton [sic]

  • profile

    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 28/Dec/2016 08:30:19

    1907 Norton for comparison, via [https://www.flickr.com/photos/hwmobs/] [https://www.flickr.com/photos/hwmobs/31910016055/]